NASO/GASTRIC FEEDINGS

Nasogastric (NG) intubation is a procedure during which a thin, plastic tube is inserted through the nostril, down the esophagus, and into the stomach. Once an NG tube is in place, healthcare providers can deliver food and medicine directly to the stomach or remove substances from it. Nasogastric (NG) intubation is most often used to deliver food and medicine to a patient when they are unable to eat or swallow.

A gastric feeding tube (G-tube or “button”) is a tube inserted through a small incision in the abdomen into the stomach and is used for long-term enteral nutrition. The G-tube can be useful where there is difficulty with swallowing because of neurologic or anatomic disorders (stroke, esophageal atresia, tracheoesophageal fistula), and to avoid the risk of aspiration pneumonia. Once the g-tube is in place, healthcare providers can deliver food and medicine directly to the stomach or remove substances from it.